Git Pull While Ignoring Local Changes?

0 votes
asked Nov 11, 2010 by markdorison

Is there a way to do a git pull that ignores any local file changes without blowing the directory away and having to perform a git clone?

7 Answers

0 votes
answered Nov 11, 2010 by seth-johnson

Look at git stash to put all of your local changes into a "stash file" and revert to the last commit. At that point, you can apply your stashed changes, or discard them.

0 votes
answered Nov 11, 2010 by jefromi

If you mean you want the pull to overwrite local changes, doing the merge as if the working tree were clean, well, clean the working tree:

git reset --hard
git pull

If there are untracked local files you could use git clean to remove them. Use git clean -f to remove untracked files, -df to remove untracked files and directories, and -xdf to remove untracked or ignored files or directories.

If on the other hand you want to keep the local modifications somehow, you'd use stash to hide them away before pulling, then reapply them afterwards:

git stash
git pull
git stash pop

I don't think it makes any sense to literally ignore the changes, though - half of pull is merge, and it needs to merge the committed versions of content with the versions it fetched.

0 votes
answered Nov 5, 2012 by strahinja-kustudic

If you are on Linux:

git fetch
for file in `git diff origin/master..HEAD --name-only`; do rm -f "$file"; done
git pull

The for loop will delete all tracked files which are changed in the local repo, so git pull will work without any problems.
The nicest thing about this is that only the tracked files will be overwritten by the files in the repo, all other files will be left untouched.

0 votes
answered Nov 24, 2014 by dr-beco

The command bellow wont work always. If you do just:

$ git checkout thebranch
Already on 'thebranch'
Your branch and 'origin/thebranch' have diverged,
and have 23 and 7 different commits each, respectively.

$ git reset --hard
HEAD is now at b05f611 Here the commit message bla, bla

$ git pull
Auto-merging thefile1.c
CONFLICT (content): Merge conflict in thefile1.c
Auto-merging README.md
CONFLICT (content): Merge conflict in README.md
Automatic merge failed; fix conflicts and then commit the result.

and so on...

To really start over, downloading thebranch and overwriting all your local changes, just do:


$ git checkout thebranch
$ git reset --hard origin/thebranch

This will work just fine.

$ git checkout thebranch
Already on 'thebranch'
Your branch and 'origin/thebranch' have diverged,
and have 23 and 7 different commits each, respectively.

$ git reset --hard origin/thebranch
HEAD is now at 7639058 Here commit message again...

$ git status
# On branch thebranch
nothing to commit (working directory clean)

$ git checkout thebranch
Already on 'thebranch'
0 votes
answered Nov 23, 2015 by artur-barseghyan

For me the following worked:

(1) First fetch all changes:

$ git fetch --all

(2) Then reset the master:

$ git reset --hard origin/master

(3) Pull/update:

$ git pull
0 votes
answered Nov 5, 2016 by petah

This will fetch the current branch and attempt to do a fast forward to master:

git fetch && git merge --ff-only origin/master
0 votes
answered Sep 15, 2017 by luke
git fetch --all && git reset --hard origin/master
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