How do I list all files of a directory?

0 votes
asked Jul 8, 2010 by duhhunjonn

How can I list all files of a directory in Python and add them to a list?

22 Answers

0 votes
answered Jul 8, 2010 by sepp2k
import os
os.listdir("somedirectory")

will return a list of all files and directories in "somedirectory".

0 votes
answered Jul 8, 2010 by pycruft

os.listdir() will get you everything that's in a directory - files and directories.

If you want just files, you could either filter this down using os.path:

from os import listdir
from os.path import isfile, join
onlyfiles = [f for f in listdir(mypath) if isfile(join(mypath, f))]

or you could use os.walk() which will yield two lists for each directory it visits - splitting into files and dirs for you. If you only want the top directory you can just break the first time it yields

from os import walk

f = []
for (dirpath, dirnames, filenames) in walk(mypath):
    f.extend(filenames)
    break

And lastly, as that example shows, adding one list to another you can either use .extend() or

>>> q = [1, 2, 3]
>>> w = [4, 5, 6]
>>> q = q + w
>>> q
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

Personally, I prefer .extend()

0 votes
answered Jul 9, 2010 by adamk

I prefer using the glob module, as it does pattern matching and expansion.

import glob
print glob.glob("/home/adam/*.txt")

Will return a list with the queried files:

['/home/adam/file1.txt', '/home/adam/file2.txt', .... ]
0 votes
answered Jul 25, 2012 by shaji
import dircache
list = dircache.listdir(pathname)
i = 0
check = len(list[0])
temp = []
count = len(list)
while count != 0:
  if len(list[i]) != check:
     temp.append(list[i-1])
     check = len(list[i])
  else:
    i = i + 1
    count = count - 1

print temp
0 votes
answered Jul 11, 2013 by johnny

Getting Full File Paths From a Directory and All Its Subdirectories

import os

def get_filepaths(directory):
    """
    This function will generate the file names in a directory 
    tree by walking the tree either top-down or bottom-up. For each 
    directory in the tree rooted at directory top (including top itself), 
    it yields a 3-tuple (dirpath, dirnames, filenames).
    """
    file_paths = []  # List which will store all of the full filepaths.

    # Walk the tree.
    for root, directories, files in os.walk(directory):
        for filename in files:
            # Join the two strings in order to form the full filepath.
            filepath = os.path.join(root, filename)
            file_paths.append(filepath)  # Add it to the list.

    return file_paths  # Self-explanatory.

# Run the above function and store its results in a variable.   
full_file_paths = get_filepaths("/Users/johnny/Desktop/TEST")

  • The path I provided in the above function contained 3 files— two of them in the root directory, and another in a subfolder called "SUBFOLDER." You can now do things like:
  • print full_file_paths which will print the list:

    • ['/Users/johnny/Desktop/TEST/file1.txt', '/Users/johnny/Desktop/TEST/file2.txt', '/Users/johnny/Desktop/TEST/SUBFOLDER/file3.dat']

If you'd like, you can open and read the contents, or focus only on files with the extension ".dat" like in the code below:

for f in full_file_paths:
  if f.endswith(".dat"):
    print f

/Users/johnny/Desktop/TEST/SUBFOLDER/file3.dat

0 votes
answered Jul 7, 2014 by barisim-net
# -** coding: utf-8 -*-
import os
import traceback

print '\n\n'

def start():
    address = "/home/ubuntu/Desktop"
    try:
        Folders = []
        Id = 1
        for item in os.listdir(address):
            endaddress = address + "/" + item
            Folders.append({'Id': Id, 'TopId': 0, 'Name': item, 'Address': endaddress })
            Id += 1         

            state = 0
            for item2 in os.listdir(endaddress):
                state = 1
            if state == 1: 
                Id = FolderToList(endaddress, Id, Id - 1, Folders)
        return Folders
    except:
        print "___________________________ ERROR ___________________________\n" + traceback.format_exc()

def FolderToList(address, Id, TopId, Folders):
    for item in os.listdir(address):
        endaddress = address + "/" + item
        Folders.append({'Id': Id, 'TopId': TopId, 'Name': item, 'Address': endaddress })
        Id += 1

        state = 0
        for item in os.listdir(endaddress):
            state = 1
        if state == 1: 
            Id = FolderToList(endaddress, Id, Id - 1, Folders)
    return Id

print start()
0 votes
answered Jul 9, 2014 by artofwarfare

I really liked adamk's answer, suggesting that you use glob(), from the module of the same name. This allows you to have pattern matching with *s.

But as other people pointed out in the comments, glob() can get tripped up over inconsistent slash directions. To help with that, I suggest you use the join() and expanduser() functions in the os.path module, and perhaps the getcwd() function in the os module, as well.

As examples:

from glob import glob

# Return everything under C:\Users\admin that contains a folder called wlp.
glob('C:\Users\admin\*\wlp')

The above is terrible - the path has been hardcoded and will only ever work on Windows between the drive name and the \s being hardcoded into the path.

from glob    import glob
from os.path import join

# Return everything under Users, admin, that contains a folder called wlp.
glob(join('Users', 'admin', '*', 'wlp'))

The above works better, but it relies on the folder name Users which is often found on Windows and not so often found on other OSs. It also relies on the user having a specific name, admin.

from glob    import glob
from os.path import expanduser, join

# Return everything under the user directory that contains a folder called wlp.
glob(join(expanduser('~'), '*', 'wlp'))

This works perfectly across all platforms.

Another great example that works perfectly across platforms and does something a bit different:

from glob    import glob
from os      import getcwd
from os.path import join

# Return everything under the current directory that contains a folder called wlp.
glob(join(getcwd(), '*', 'wlp'))

Hope these examples help you see the power of a few of the functions you can find in the standard Python library modules.

0 votes
answered Jul 10, 2014 by yauhen-yakimovich

If you are looking for a Python implementation of find, this is a recipe I use rather frequently:

from findtools.find_files import (find_files, Match)

# Recursively find all *.sh files in **/usr/bin**
sh_files_pattern = Match(filetype='f', name='*.sh')
found_files = find_files(path='/usr/bin', match=sh_files_pattern)

for found_file in found_files:
    print found_file

So I made a PyPI package out of it and there is also a GitHub repository. I hope that someone finds it potentially useful for this code.

0 votes
answered Jul 10, 2014 by apogentus
def list_files(path):
    # returns a list of names (with extension, without full path) of all files 
    # in folder path
    files = []
    for name in os.listdir(path):
        if os.path.isfile(os.path.join(path, name)):
            files.append(name)
    return files 
0 votes
answered Jul 13, 2014 by the2ndson

Returning a list of absolute filepaths, does not recurse into subdirectories

L = [os.path.join(os.getcwd(),f) for f in os.listdir('.') if os.path.isfile(os.path.join(os.getcwd(),f))]
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