Javascript objects: get parent [duplicate]

0 votes
asked Jun 5, 2010 by d%c3%a4nu

This question already has an answer here:

12 Answers

0 votes
answered Jun 5, 2010 by matthew-flaschen

No. There is no way of knowing which object it came from.

s and obj.subObj both simply have references to the same object.

You could also do:

var obj = { subObj: {foo: 'hello world'} };
var obj2 = {};
obj2.subObj = obj.subObj;
var s = obj.subObj;

You now have three references, obj.subObj, obj2.subObj, and s, to the same object. None of them is special.

0 votes
answered Jun 29, 2011 by trevor

Try this until a non-no answer appears:

function parent() {
  this.child;
  interestingProperty = "5";
  ...
}

function child() {
  this.parent;
  ...
}

a = new parent();
a.child = new child();
a.child.parent = a; // this gives the child a reference to its parent

alert(a.interestingProperty+" === "+a.child.parent.interestingProperty);
0 votes
answered Jun 9, 2012 by lukasz

There is a more 'smooth' solution for this :)

var Foo = function(){
  this.par = 3;

  this.sub = new(function(t){ //using virtual function to create sub object and pass parent object via 't'
    this.p = t;
    this.subFunction = function(){
      alert(this.p.par);
    }
  })(this);
}

var myObj = new Foo();
myObj.sub.subFunction() // will popup 3;

myObj.par = 5;
myObj.sub.subFunction() // will popup 5;
0 votes
answered Jun 16, 2012 by mik

A nested object (child) inside another object (parent) cannot get data directly from its parent.

Have a look on this:

var main = {
    name : "main object",
    child : {
        name : "child object"
    }
};

If you ask the main object what its child name is (main.child.name) you will get it.
Instead you cannot do it vice versa because the child doesn't know who its parent is.
(You can get main.name but you won't get main.child.parent.name).

By the way, a function could be useful to solve this clue.
Let's extend the code above:

var main = {
    name : "main object",
    child : {
        name : "child object"
    },
    init : function() {
        this.child.parent = this;
        delete this.init;
        return this;
    }
}.init();

Inside the init function you can get the parent object simply calling this.
So we define the parent property directly inside the child object.
Then (optionally) we can remove the init method.
Finally we give the main object back as output from the init function.

If you try to get main.child.parent.name now you will get it right.
It is a little bit tricky but it works fine.

0 votes
answered Jun 29, 2013 by nonlinearsound

This is an old question but as I came across it looking for an answer I thought I will add my answer to this to help others as soon as they got the same problem.

I have a structure like this:

var structure = {
    "root":{
        "name":"Main Level",
        nodes:{
            "node1":{
                "name":"Node 1"  
            },
            "node2":{
                "name":"Node 2"  
            },
            "node3":{
                "name":"Node 3"  
            }
        }
    }
}

Currently, by referencing one of the sub nodes I don't know how to get the parent node with it's name value "Main Level".

Now I introduce a recursive function that travels the structure and adds a parent attribute to each node object and fills it with its parent like so.

var setParent = function(o){
     if(o.nodes != undefined){
          for(n in o.nodes){
              o.nodes[n].parent = o;
              setParent(o.nodes[n]);
          }
     }
}

Then I just call that function and can now get the parent of the current node in this object tree.

setParent(structure.root);

If I now have a reference to the seconds sub node of root, I can just call.

var node2 = structure.root.nodes["node2"];
console.log(node2.parent.name);

and it will output "Main Level".

Hope this helps..

0 votes
answered Jun 8, 2014 by sirpython

You could try this(this uses a constructor, but I'm sure you can change it around a bit):

function Obj() {
    this.subObj = {
        // code
    }
    this.subObj.parent = this;
}
0 votes
answered Jun 13, 2014 by poindess

To further iterate on Mik's answer, you could also recursivey attach a parent to all nested objects.

var myApp = {

    init: function() {
        for (var i in this) {
            if (typeof this[i] == 'object') {
                    this[i].init = this.init;
                    this[i].init();
                    this[i].parent = this;
            }
        }
        return this;
    },

    obj1: {
        obj2: {
            notify: function() {
                console.log(this.parent.parent.obj3.msg);
            }
        }
    },

    obj3: {
        msg: 'Hello'
    }

}.init();

myApp.obj1.obj2.notify();

http://jsbin.com/zupepelaciya/1/watch?js,console

0 votes
answered Jun 14, 2014 by michael-warner

You will need the child to store the parents this variable. As the Parent is the only object that has access to it's this variable it will also need a function that places the this variable into the child's that variable, something like this.

var Parent = {
  Child : {
    that : {},
  },
  init : function(){
    this.Child.that = this;
  }
}

To test this out try to run this in Firefox's Scratchpad, it worked for me.

var Parent = {
  data : "Parent Data",

  Child : {
    that : {},
    data : "Child Data",
    display : function(){
      console.log(this.data);
      console.log(this.that.data);
    }
  },
  init : function(){
    this.Child.that = this;
  }
}

Parent.init();
Parent.Child.display();
0 votes
answered Jun 23, 2014 by axius

Just in keeping the parent value in child attribute

var Foo = function(){
    this.val= 4;
    this.test={};
    this.test.val=6;
    this.test.par=this;
}

var myObj = new Foo();
alert(myObj.val);
alert(myObj.test.val);
alert(myObj.test.par.val);
0 votes
answered Jun 9, 2015 by sean

when I load in a json object I usually setup the relationships by iterating through the object arrays like this:

    for (var i = 0; i < some.json.objectarray.length; i++) {
        var p = some.json.objectarray[i];
        for (var j = 0; j < p.somechildarray.length; j++) {
            p.somechildarray[j].parent = p;
        }
    }

then you can access the parent object of some object in the somechildarray by using .parent

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