Using Tkinter in python to edit the title bar

0 votes
asked Mar 7, 2010 by dan

I am trying to add a custom title to a window but I am having troubles with it. I know my code isn't right but when I run it, it creates 2 windows instead, one with just the title tk and another bigger window with "Simple Prog". How do I make it so that the tk window has the title "Simple Prog" instead of having a new additional window. I dont think I'm suppose to have the Tk() part because when i have that in my complete code, there's an error

from tkinter import Tk, Button, Frame, Entry, END

class ABC(Frame):
    def __init__(self,parent=None):
        Frame.__init__(self,parent)
        self.parent = parent
        self.pack()
        ABC.make_widgets(self)

    def make_widgets(self):
        self.root = Tk()
        self.root.title("Simple Prog")

5 Answers

0 votes
answered Mar 7, 2010 by colin-valliant

self.parent is a reference to the actual window, so self.root.title should be self.parent.title, and self.root shouldn't exist.

0 votes
answered Mar 8, 2010 by bryan-oakley

If you don't create a root window, tkinter will create one for you when you try to create any other widget. Thus, in your __init__, because you haven't yet created a root window when you initialize the frame, tkinter will create one for you. Then, you call make_widgets which creates a second root window. That is why you are seeing two windows.

A well-written tkinter program should always explicitly create a root window before creating any other widgets.

When you modify your code to explicitly create the root window, you'll end up with one window with the expected title.

Example:

from tkinter import Tk, Button, Frame, Entry, END

class ABC(Frame):
    def __init__(self,parent=None):
        Frame.__init__(self,parent)
        self.parent = parent
        self.pack()
        self.make_widgets()

    def make_widgets(self):
        # don't assume that self.parent is a root window.
        # instead, call `winfo_toplevel to get the root window
        self.winfo_toplevel().title("Simple Prog")

        # this adds something to the frame, otherwise the default
        # size of the window will be very small
        label = Entry(self)
        label.pack(side="top", fill="x")

root = Tk()
abc = ABC(root)
root.mainloop()

Also note the use of self.make_widgets() rather than ABS.make_widgets(self). While both end up doing the same thing, the former is the proper way to call the function.

0 votes
answered Mar 11, 2010 by lugte098

Try something like:

from tkinter import Tk, Button, Frame, Entry, END

class ABC(Frame):
    def __init__(self, master=None):
        Frame.__init__(self, master)
        self.pack()        

root = Tk()
app = ABC(master=root)
app.master.title("Simple Prog")
app.mainloop()
root.destroy()

Now you should have a frame with a title, then afterwards you can add windows for different widgets if you like.

0 votes
answered Mar 28, 2012 by danny-staple

Having just done this myself you can do it this way:

from tkinter import Tk, Button, Frame, Entry, END

class ABC(Frame):
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        Frame.__init__(self, parent)
        self.parent = parent
        self.pack()
        ABC.make_widgets(self)

    def make_widgets(self):
        self.parent.title("Simple Prog")

You will see the title change, and you won't get two windows. I've left my parent as master as in the Tkinter reference stuff in the python library documentation.

0 votes
answered Mar 22, 2016 by rethipher

For anybody who runs into the issue of having two windows open, and runs across this question. Here is how I stumbled upon a solution.

The reason the code in this question is producing two windows is because

Frame.__init__(self, parent)

is being run before

self.root = Tk()

The simple fix is to run Tk() before running Frame.__init_()

self.root = Tk()
Frame.__init__(self, parent)

Why that is the case, I'm not entirely sure.

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