Assigning out/ref parameters in Moq

0 votes
asked Jul 1, 2009 by richard-szalay

Is it possible to assign an out/ref parameter using Moq (3.0)?

I've looked at using Callback(), but Action<> does not support ref parameters because it's based on generics. I'd also preferably like to put a constraint (It.Is) on the input of the ref parameter, though I can do that in the callback.

I know that Rhino Mocks supports this functionality, but the project I'm working on is already using Moq.

7 Answers

0 votes
answered Jul 1, 2009 by gishu

Seems like it is not possible out of the box. Looks like someone attempted a solution

See this forum post http://code.google.com/p/moq/issues/detail?id=176

this question Verify value of reference parameter with Moq

0 votes
answered Jul 28, 2010 by craig-celeste

For 'out', the following seems to work for me.

public interface IService
{
    void DoSomething(out string a);
}

[TestMethod]
public void Test()
{
    var service = new Mock<IService>();
    var expectedValue = "value";
    service.Setup(s => s.DoSomething(out expectedValue));

    string actualValue;
    service.Object.DoSomething(out actualValue);
    Assert.AreEqual(actualValue, expectedValue);
}

I'm guessing that Moq looks at the value of 'expectedValue' when you call Setup and remembers it.

For 'ref', I'm looking for an answer also.

I found the following QuickStart guide useful: https://github.com/Moq/moq4/wiki/Quickstart

0 votes
answered Jul 1, 2011 by fabrice

This can be a solution .

[Test]
public void TestForOutParameterInMoq()
{
  //Arrange
  _mockParameterManager= new Mock<IParameterManager>();

  Mock<IParameter > mockParameter= new Mock<IParameter >();
  //Parameter affectation should be useless but is not. It's really used by Moq 
  IParameter parameter= mockParameter.Object;

  //Mock method used in UpperParameterManager
  _mockParameterManager.Setup(x => x.OutMethod(out parameter));

  //Act with the real instance
  _UpperParameterManager.UpperOutMethod(out parameter);

  //Assert that method used on the out parameter of inner out method are really called
  mockParameter.Verify(x => x.FunctionCalledInOutMethodAfterInnerOutMethod(),Times.Once());

}
0 votes
answered Jul 30, 2011 by kosau

This is documentation from Moq site:

// out arguments
var outString = "ack";
// TryParse will return true, and the out argument will return "ack", lazy evaluated
mock.Setup(foo => foo.TryParse("ping", out outString)).Returns(true);


// ref arguments
var instance = new Bar();
// Only matches if the ref argument to the invocation is the same instance
mock.Setup(foo => foo.Submit(ref instance)).Returns(true);
0 votes
answered Jul 25, 2013 by scott-wegner

Avner Kashtan provides an extension method in his blog which allows setting the out parameter from a callback: Moq, Callbacks and Out parameters: a particularly tricky edge case

The solution is both elegant and hacky. Elegant in that it provides a fluent syntax that feels at-home with other Moq callbacks. And hacky because it relies on calling some internal Moq APIs via reflection.

The extension method provided at the above link didn't compile for me, so I've provided an edited version below. You'll need to create a signature for each number of input parameters you have; I've provided 0 and 1, but extending it further should be simple:

public static class MoqExtensions
{
    public delegate void OutAction<TOut>(out TOut outVal);
    public delegate void OutAction<in T1,TOut>(T1 arg1, out TOut outVal);

    public static IReturnsThrows<TMock, TReturn> OutCallback<TMock, TReturn, TOut>(this ICallback<TMock, TReturn> mock, OutAction<TOut> action)
        where TMock : class
    {
        return OutCallbackInternal(mock, action);
    }

    public static IReturnsThrows<TMock, TReturn> OutCallback<TMock, TReturn, T1, TOut>(this ICallback<TMock, TReturn> mock, OutAction<T1, TOut> action)
        where TMock : class
    {
        return OutCallbackInternal(mock, action);
    }

    private static IReturnsThrows<TMock, TReturn> OutCallbackInternal<TMock, TReturn>(ICallback<TMock, TReturn> mock, object action)
        where TMock : class
    {
        mock.GetType()
            .Assembly.GetType("Moq.MethodCall")
            .InvokeMember("SetCallbackWithArguments", BindingFlags.InvokeMethod | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance, null, mock,
                new[] { action });
        return mock as IReturnsThrows<TMock, TReturn>;
    }
}

With the above extension method, you can test an interface with out parameters such as:

public interface IParser
{
    bool TryParse(string token, out int value);
}

.. with the following Moq setup:

    [TestMethod]
    public void ParserTest()
    {
        Mock<IParser> parserMock = new Mock<IParser>();

        int outVal;
        parserMock
            .Setup(p => p.TryParse("6", out outVal))
            .OutCallback((string t, out int v) => v = 6)
            .Returns(true);

        int actualValue;
        bool ret = parserMock.Object.TryParse("6", out actualValue);

        Assert.IsTrue(ret);
        Assert.AreEqual(6, actualValue);
    }



Edit: To support void-return methods, you simply need to add new overload methods:

public static ICallbackResult OutCallback<TOut>(this ICallback mock, OutAction<TOut> action)
{
    return OutCallbackInternal(mock, action);
}

public static ICallbackResult OutCallback<T1, TOut>(this ICallback mock, OutAction<T1, TOut> action)
{
    return OutCallbackInternal(mock, action);
}

private static ICallbackResult OutCallbackInternal(ICallback mock, object action)
{
    mock.GetType().Assembly.GetType("Moq.MethodCall")
        .InvokeMember("SetCallbackWithArguments", BindingFlags.InvokeMethod | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance, null, mock, new[] { action });
    return (ICallbackResult)mock;
}

This allows testing interfaces such as:

public interface IValidationRule
{
    void Validate(string input, out string message);
}

[TestMethod]
public void ValidatorTest()
{
    Mock<IValidationRule> validatorMock = new Mock<IValidationRule>();

    string outMessage;
    validatorMock
        .Setup(v => v.Validate("input", out outMessage))
        .OutCallback((string i, out string m) => m  = "success");

    string actualMessage;
    validatorMock.Object.Validate("input", out actualMessage);

    Assert.AreEqual("success", actualMessage);
}
0 votes
answered Sep 15, 2017 by maxshuty

I struggled with this for an hour this afternoon and could not find an answer anywhere. After playing around on my own with it I was able to come up with a solution which worked for me.

string firstOutParam = "first out parameter string";
string secondOutParam = 100;
mock.SetupAllProperties();
mock.Setup(m=>m.Method(out firstOutParam, out secondOutParam)).Returns(value);

The key here is mock.SetupAllProperties(); which will stub out all of the properties for you. This may not work in every test case scenario, but if all you care about is getting the return value of YourMethod then this will work fine.

0 votes
answered Sep 15, 2017 by victor-mukherjee

To return a value along with setting ref parameter, here is a piece of code:

public static class MoqExtensions
{
    public static IReturnsResult<TMock> DelegateReturns<TMock, TReturn, T>(this IReturnsThrows<TMock, TReturn> mock, T func) where T : class
        where TMock : class
    {
        mock.GetType().Assembly.GetType("Moq.MethodCallReturn`2").MakeGenericType(typeof(TMock), typeof(TReturn))
            .InvokeMember("SetReturnDelegate", BindingFlags.InvokeMethod | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance, null, mock,
                new[] { func });
        return (IReturnsResult<TMock>)mock;
    }
}

Then declare your own delegate matching the signature of to-be-mocked method and provide your own method implementation.

public delegate int MyMethodDelegate(int x, ref int y);

    [TestMethod]
    public void TestSomething()
    {
        //Arrange
        var mock = new Mock<ISomeInterface>();
        var y = 0;
        mock.Setup(m => m.MyMethod(It.IsAny<int>(), ref y))
        .DelegateReturns((MyMethodDelegate)((int x, ref int y)=>
         {
            y = 1;
            return 2;
         }));
    }
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